Friday, July 08, 2011

Sports injuries in Geelong

from w
I think the figures seem inflated - such as over 1000 a week at one clinic, but here is the article in the local newspaper, the Geelong Advertiser, this week. The topic is of concern because many of our youngsters in Geelong play Aussie Rules footie and that's a good thing - better than watching the well-paid gladiators!

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MORE than a thousand people a week are being treated for sports injuries at just one Geelong health-service provider.

Figures obtained by the Geelong Advertiser also reveal that children aged 10-14 account for the highest number of hospital admissions for sports injuries and that the majority of those hurt are playing Australian rules football.
Corio Bay Health, which has several clinics, said 1300 people were seeking treatment for sports-related injuries every week.

Sports injuries are putting a strain on hospitals and clinics throughout Victoria, according to Monash University sports injury epidemiologist Professor Caroline Finch.

"Sports injuries are clogging up beds," Prof Finch said.

"The injuries are obviously not as severe as road accidents, where people suffer multiple injuries, but they're using up hospital beds for a couple of nights and the vast majority of these sports injuries are in people under 25.

"Even people as young as five and six are coming in with fractures of the upper arm."

A study of injury rates, headed by Prof Finch, has revealed that hospitals across the state treated twice as many patients for sports injuries as they did for road accidents.

Prof Finch's study also revealed that sports injuries cost the country $2 billion a year in medical bills and time off work.

The data provides the first truly definitive look in almost a decade at the impact of exercise-related injuries but according to leading sports doctor Peter Larkins, it is only the tip of the iceberg.

Dr Larkins said those who sought hospital treatment only represented a small proportion of sports injuries, with many others either seeking help at private and bulk billing clinics or ignoring treatment altogether.

Corio Bay Health Group managing director Jeff Oxley said hamstring and ankle strains were among the most common complaints from the region's footballers, basketballers, netballers and other athletes.

Knee injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament tears are not as common but are putting local players on the sidelines for significant periods.

Mr Oxley said local footy injury trends were similar to the AFL but the reality of putting aside time for recovery was far different.

"It's really not only the injury itself; it's the cost of the injury and from a local sense it becomes a personal cost. The player has to fork out most of the money and that's not just for medical bills, it's also for loss of employment," he said.

"It's really the time off work, which financially can be quite a drain."
At junior level, Mr Oxley said many players suffered "overuse" injuries such as osteitis pubis. Older players tend to suffer

"wear and tear of joints and in the middle group of players it's the hamstring strains and ankle strains, corkies and facial injuries."

Geelong Hospital head of paediatics Dr Dave Fuller said younger patients admitted with sports injuries were often at the higher end of the scale but encouraged youngsters to continue with physical activity.

"There will be kids on the ward that have injuries related to sport such as bone breaks but they're managed by the surgical team," Dr Fuller said.

"Even though there can be be injuries, sports participation has lots of positives such as helping with weight and self esteem issues from team participation."

The data provides the first truly definitive look in almost a decade at the impact of exercise-related injuries but according to leading sports doctor Peter Larkins, it is only the tip of the iceberg.

Dr Larkins said those who sought hospital treatment only represented a small proportion of sports injuries, with many others either seeking help at private and bulk billing clinics or ignoring treatment altogether.

Talented junior baseballer Harry McGovern fits into the main risk category. The 14-year-old was a member of the Victorian under-14 squad but faces an extended period on the sidelines after having a shoulder reconstruction to repair a tear of his shoulder joint lining.

He was one of more 4616 people to be admitted to Geelong's hospitals with serious sports injuries during the past eight years, according to Monash University's Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit. Those patients either required surgery or treatment requiring them to occupy a hospital bed for at least one night.
injury rates, headed by Prof Finch, has revealed that hospitals across the state treated twice as many patients for sports injuries as they did for road accidents.

Corio Bay Health Group managing director Jeff Oxley said hamstring and ankle strains were among the most common complaints from the region's footballers, basketballers, netballers and other athletes.

Knee injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament tears are not as common but are putting local players on the sidelines for significant periods.

Mr Oxley said local footy injury trends were similar to the AFL but the reality of putting aside time for recovery was far different.

"It's really not only the injury itself; it's the cost of the injury and from a local sense it becomes a personal cost. The player has to fork out most of the money and that's not just for medical bills, it's also for loss of employment," he said.

"It's really the time off work, which financially can be quite a drain."
At junior level, Mr Oxley said many players suffered "overuse" injuries such as osteitis pubis. Older players tend to suffer

"wear and tear of joints and in the middle group of players it's the hamstring strains and ankle strains, corkies and facial injuries."

Geelong Hospital head of paediatrics Dr Dave Fuller said younger patients admitted with sports injuries were often at the higher end of the scale but encouraged youngsters to continue with physical activity.

"There will be kids on the ward that have injuries related to sport such as bone breaks but they're managed by the surgical team," Dr Fuller said.

"Even though there can be be injuries, sports participation has lots of positives such as helping with weight and self esteem issues from team participation."

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2 Comments:

Blogger Jeff A. said...

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5:41 PM  
Blogger Xavier Smith said...

I wonder if trends in sports injuries among teens have shown an increase or decrease in the age group. I'm really surprised to see such high numbers. Then I remember I still have injuries from sports I played in high school.
Xavier Smith
http://www.lambtonphysio.com.au

5:42 PM  

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